Food Grown Nutrients

//Food Grown Nutrients
Food Grown Nutrients

Bio-Available, Effective Nutrition

Human physiology is designed to obtain nutrients from plants and natural foods. Nutrients occur in whole foods as complexes, offering a natural synergy. Research repeatedly confirms that nutrients are ideally ingested as part of a whole food because of the complexity and inter-relationship of macronutrients, micronutrients, and phytochemicals in foods. Nutritional compounds delivered as a food concentrate or in a food matrix offer nutrients contextually with naturally-occurring supportive cofactors as a food complex, rather than a nutrient isolate.

Food Grown nutrients are a unique form of nutritional supplement that are recognized and assimilated by the body as foods. Food-based nutrients are ideal because of their innate compatibility with human biochemistry and physiology. Nutrients in foods are most often contained within a natural cellular compartment or microstructure within the whole food complex. Food Grown nutrients are incorporated into a food matrix through a natural process. This process leads to a highly biologically active form of the nutrient which is bonded in a food matrix and nutrient complex just as it would naturally be in food.

Structuring matrices for nutrient delivery is a subject of enormous scientific interest and many matrix materials are being studied. These food matrixes consists of proteins, complex carbohydrates, lipids, bioflavonoids, and fiber into which site-selective carriers integrate vitamins and minerals. The food matrix includes peptide carriers and cofactors naturally-occurring in foods that act as chaperones, delivering nutrients to the cells and tissues of the body. This naturally facilitates absorption, enhances bioavailability, and supports bioactivity at the cellular level for metabolic processes.

Concept of bioavailability includes:1

  1. release of nutrients from its matrix
  2. absoprtion, which includes:
    • availability for absorption (bioaccessibility)
    • absorption through metabolic pathways
  3. bioactivity, which includes:
    • distribution to the tissues
    • storage in nutrient pools
    • metabolic utilization of the nutrient

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  1. 18. Briviba K. Definition of bioavailability from the viewpoint of human nutrition. BfR-Symposium Presentation. 2013. Jan 16-17.